BGL Media: Music Videos for Kindergarteners

Some of the most fun we have here at BGL is when we write original songs and produce music videos to go along with them.

The following are intended for a kindergarten English-as-a-Foreign-Language (EFL) audience, but try them out with your little ones at home and sit back as the inevitable booty-shaking sing-a-long commences!

Here’s a sampling of some of our favorites from the past year.

 

 

 

 

Does your curriculum yearn for some content-connected songs and videos? Email us at info@banyangloballearning.com or leave a comment to find out more about our services.

Field Trips Live: Petersen Automotive Museum

It is no surprise that with 4.12 million miles of highway, 88% of the people in the United States own cars. What better place for a car museum than Los Angeles which is notorious for its amazing cars and terrible traffic? Recently, after completing their own car design project, BGL’s Grade 8 Classroom Live students Tsai Hsing School took a Field Trip Live to the Petersen Automotive Museum which as building is on its own, depending on who you talk to, either a marvel of engineering or an eyesore. We’re going with the former, but see for yourself:

 

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Credit: Shutterstock.com

This FTL brought students to a location that is unlike any experience in their home country. The Petersen owns nearly 400 cars. 150 are on display. You can visit the rest in the vault unless they are out on loan or being repaired. Everywhere in the museum there are docents; these are people ready to answer your questions about the cars. Docents always carry sheepskin mitts so that when they are not helping visitors they can keep the cars buffed to a high shine.

 

 

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A young visitor to the Petersen knows he is the right size to drive this concept car, but is unsure about how to get in. Credit: Travis Moyer

The Model T Ford is known the world over so the United States is often mis-credited with inventing the automobile. Karl Benz invented the first motor car in Germany in 1885. People were so uncertain of the safety or utility of the vehicle that he had his wife drive it 66 kilometers on her own to show that “even a woman could do it!” The first Model T came off the production line in October 1908.

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Credit: Shutterstock.com

 

In addition to cars which made history, there are always exhibits of particular types of cars – and cars of the future. Did you know that the first electric car was made (by Ford) in 1914? There were also steam cars. Some of the cars of the future on display include solar and wind powered cars.

A favorite with the students was the movie cars exhibit. Among others, they saw James Bond’s Aston Martin, the Bat Mobile and Chitty Chitty Bang Bang. One of the few touchable cars was this one from the movie, well… Cars.

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Credit: independent.ie

In addition to our virtual student visitors from Taiwan, there were several students from the Art Center College of Design, drawing cars and designing cars in a special computer assisted design lab. Cars are  imagined, drawn by hand, drawn on a computer, mocked up with a variety of materials, and if the process goes further, sculpted in clay. Students go on to not only design cars, but design film sets, video games and more. Teacher Travis interviewed one soon-to-be-freshman while students observed via Travis’s iPhone and asked questions of their own:

Afterwards, students used the valuable information field trip as inspiration to design their own cars as part of a larger unit on the physics of modern car design. Yet another example of how BGL is changing education for a changing world.

Field Trips Live: Holiday Round Robin

Flashing back to the holiday season, the following is a highlight reel of reflections from BGL’s junior high superstars at Tsai Hsing School. This special event was a multi-point Holiday Field Trip Live that connected the students live to teachers in North Carolina, Portland, OR, Los Angeles and Taipei simultaneously. In a brand new round-robin format, students moved digitally from room to room to hear personal reflections on December holiday traditions. 

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A critical component of BGL’s FTL model is to facilitate thoughtful activities after the trip so that students can synthesize and apply whatever they learn during the trip. The students chosen to share their work here showed great attention to detail, thoughtful word choice and a true showcase of their refined English skills!

Chadwick:

Christmas is an especially important holiday for Christians. There are lots of different kinds of ways to celebrate Christmas. Some people wear a Christmas hat and dress up. On the other hand, some people prefer to decorate a Christmas tree or even have a great big meal. Americans have some fascinating ways to celebrate Christmas.

First of all, some people in America get together and do special things. Some make cookies and others make a gingerbread. Some people even make a very big cake for their relatives. Others go out and have a big meal. Same as always, they have a long break and people go out.

Second, Americans help others. Sometimes if they have cookies or some small snacks that they cannot finish eating it, they give poor people their cookies. Some people even invite poor people to their house and celebrate with them.

Last, people decorate lots of things. People usually decorate their house to make their house bright and shiny. Most famous landmarks, such as Venice Canals, put some fantastic decorations to make people feel warm and delighted.

Christmas is a really big day you can spend time with your relatives or friends. You just finished my article. Why not go home and spend time with your favorite people from anywhere in the world and say “Merry Christmas” to them!

Vanessa:

On Christmas, Americans spend time having fun with their family. They have a Christmas tree, stockings, and lots of fun things to do together. They put lots of gifts under the tree for their children. The children think the gifts are from Santa and are excited about the gifts. Children put their stockings on their bedroom door for Santa to put gifts in. People sing Christmas songs with family to spread Christmas cheer. Some people bake cookies and make gingerbread houses with friends and family. Christmas sounds like it is so much fun, I would like to celebrate Christmas, too!

Henry:

Christmas is a well-known holiday in many countries. Today, there are many different ways to celebrate Christmas, not only sending presents. The Christmas tree is always a must on Christmas. Now, people buy artificial trees to replace real trees that were cut down. It is more eco-friendly and more convenient. You don’t need to go to the forest to cut down trees every year just use the same tree is appropriate. If you got the tree, the next step is to decorate it. Ornaments now are more choices not only balls and strings. You can put up your photos from young to old around the tree or write some wishes on a paper hang it up.

Some gingerbread on a cold day is a great enjoyment. Roll the dough and cut the shape you want with cutters. Caroling is also important on Christmas Day. Singing the traditional songs for Christmas is making the day better and more fun. Now, more people don’t send gifts to family members but homeless shelters. They don’t have a home or a family so it kind of you to send them some blankets or hot tea and cookies.

All in all, Christmas is a day of joy and love. Presents or gifts aren’t as important as you think if you do something more than you do normally. Try to celebrate your Christmas a different and fun way.

Amber:

Americans celebrate Christmas in different ways. Many Americans celebrate Christmas with their families or friends. They exchange gifts and eat dinner together. They put their gifts under Christmas trees or in socks on Christmas Eve. And on Christmas, they will happily open their presents. Some Americans will buy Christmas trees and decorate it. The decorations are warm and often have a big star on the top of it.

Some Americans make Christmas snacks, like gingerbread houses and candy canes. Christmas is a warm holiday to celebrate. Every American’s celebration is unique and can’t be replaced. All Americans have their own traditions, we should respect all of them.

Using Field Trips Live to Explore Psychology as a Career

BGL’s Field Trips Live (FTLs) are changing education for a changing world. Students now have access to the highest quality educators and experiences no matter where they are as technology lifts the limitations of physical location. FTLs are particularly well-suited for connecting students with dynamic experts in any given professional field. 

An example of this new approach in education plays out in this video. 8th grade classes at Tsai Hsing School in Taipei, Taiwan welcomed Dr. Adriana Galvan, a psychology professor from UCLA, into their classroom as a guest speaker. Suddenly the 6,774 mile distance between their campuses did not prevent them from creating a meaningful connection. This was great news considering that the subject of the the research conducted by the award-winning professor is precisely the age group of the students she conversed with over Zoom.

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Dr. Adriana Galvan at a conference speaking about the adolescent brain. Photo credit: United Way King County via YouTube.

The question-and-answer session with Dr. Galvan about her work as a research psychologist – which focuses on adolescent decision-making – spawned a fascinating dialogue between the 8th grade novices and the seasoned professional. Important for the impact of the experience, the conversation did not occur in a vacuum; rather, beforehand, the students researched adolescent decision-making and took the industry standard Flinders decision-making questionnaire. The results of the survey shed light on which which factor was most influential in the respondent’s decision-making processes: self-confidence, vigilance, panic, evasiveness or complacency.

The results were surprising for the teenage students. For example, when asked what they thought would be the most important factor for their own decision-making, the vast majority of students responded either self-confidence or vigilance:

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However, when they were asked specific questions about their decision-making students realized that each of these five factors played significant roles in decision-making within the class as a whole. Students were asked to reflect on why they thought the results came out the way they did and many had interesting takes on their own psychology. For example, one student who scored high on panic said that she was worried about how her decisions would affect other people. When pressed to explain it further, she discovered that it was less about how the decision would affect other people and more about how it would affect their perception of her. It’s a reasonable fear to have, especially for a teen, but one that she may not have been aware of were it not for exposing them to the field of psychology at such a relatively young age.

The talk with Dr. Galvan gave students an opportunity to gain valuable insight into the results of the Flinders questionnaire. But the floor was also open for the students to ask any question they wanted about Dr. Galvan’s work in addition to their own psychology and that of their peers. Not surprisingly, what ensued was educational gold. Here are some of the more compelling questions asked by the students:

  • Why do I think my parents know nothing about me while they think they know everything about me?
  • Why do we have emotions?
  • I think it’s quite interesting that the video used scientific researches to explain the crazy stuff that teenagers do all the time. I want to ask: if we finish our brain development at the age of 25, then why do the laws want us to take responsibility at the age of 20?
  • Why do teenagers talk on the phone so much?
  • Why don’t I like to study?
  • What is a difference between the brain of a humorous person and an un-humorous person?
  • Why do we dream?

 

Dr. Galvan’s answers were fantastic. Some of the bigger hits were the following:

  • Student: Why do teenagers laugh at things that aren’t funny?
  • Dr. Galvan [paraphrased]: People use laughter in different ways for different reasons, it’s not just when something is funny. One thing laughter is used for is to create bonds between people. So when teenagers laugh at things that aren’t funny, maybe they are doing it in order to make friends.

 

  • Student: Why am I not tired when I go to bed?
  • Dr. Galvan [paraphrased]: This is very interesting. There’s a phenomenon called “temporal separation” that we see across many different species. The adolescents of a species stay up later than children and than adults in order to potentially give them the opportunity to experiment with being the ones in charge. So, it’s like they are using the temporal separation to try out adulthood while the adults are all asleep.

 

See the conversation with one of the two classes here:

All in all, this was a fantastic example of how FTLs and can provide the very best educational opportunities to students no matter where they are in the world.

For more from Dr. Galvan, check out her UCLA faculty page and her TEDxYouth talk with over a half million hits on YouTube:

Chinese New Year Song for Kids

Happy Lunar New Year, everyone! There is a famous legend that accompanies Chinese New Year about a monster named Nian (which is Mandarin for “year”). In ancient times, Nian terrorizes a town until an old man figures out that Nian is afraid of loud noises and the color red. That’s why today people wear red and shoot off firecrackers to celebrate the new year – to keep Nian at bay!

And, BGL Media wrote a song about it! It’s a good little ditty that has over 34k hits on YouTube!

Happy New Year!

Americastle – Our TV Show for Kindy Kids!

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BGL is excited to announce the premier of Americastle, an educational show built around our BRIDGES kindergarten curriculum. For those of you who know BGL staff, you’ll see several familiar faces here. Great work, everyone!
The pilot episode can also be viewed anytime via direct link on YouTube (while you’re there, check out the rest of the videos on our channel!). It will also air on public access television in Los Angeles on Sunday 8/26 at 6:30am and 6:30pm PT on the Arroyo Channel (Charter 32 in Pasadena, AT&T U-Verse 99-Pasadena in LA) and can be viewed online at pasadenamedia.org at those times.
Please share this in your classroom, and spread the word about the air times. Thanks for watching!

Investigating themselves: Students are data detectives in crowd-sourced Big Dayta Project

Over 800 participants worldwide and growing every day

Big Dayta is an international collaboration of students sharing what they do every hour for one typical weekday. That data is collected into a single spreadsheet that classrooms can then analyze. Over 800 students worldwide have shared their data to date.

What does a student do with 24 hours on a typical day? Do they sleep for 8 hours and go to school for 6 hours? How does this compare to their best friend, their entire class, or even more than 800 students around the world? With Big Dayta, students are able to make these comparisons and analyze data whether they are in first grade or about to graduate from high school. Developmentally appropriate (and Common Core aligned) ideas are provided for grades 1-12.

Students can be guided by whatever they find most interesting to investigate. Guiding research questions may include:

  • How much homework do kids in my grade do?
  • How does amount of homework differ between countries?
  • Does the amount students sleep change as they get older?
  • Where do kids spend the most time with their families?
  • What are most kids in my grade doing at 4pm? Is this different from kids in other grades?
  • And much, much more, based on whatever the kids want to find out!

All suggestions provided in the Idea Guide are Common Core aligned, so teachers can know that they are giving students a chance to satisfy their curiosity about other kids, while meeting the standards. “Humans are naturally curious about each other,” according to educational consultant Stephanie Ramsey, Ph.D., “So they do these calculations to get at the information, without thinking of it as a math problem. Math, reading, and writing all become tools to solve real-life questions.”

While the basic idea is simple, students keep track of what the do every hour on a typical weekday, the opportunities for application are enormous. Students can practice academic skills (analyzing data, stating claims and evidence, adding, subtracting, and more), and they can also connect with each other online to share their findings and debate what conclusions we can draw. The Big Dayta Facebook page gives students the chance to connect over their shared analysis.

The idea for Big Dayta came from inquisitive students. According to Seth Fleischauer, president of Banyan Global Learning, “Big Dayta started out of a fifth grade classroom in Taipei, Taiwan. Our students there were collaborating with another class in America and they wanted to know more about them. As a group, they came up with the idea with this survey. That was four years ago, and we’ve been slowly building it ever since. This year, BGL teachers pooled their resources and time to in an effort see if we could make a larger impact.”

Teachers can access a number of resources to support them in using Big Dayta in the classroom:

  • A slideshow introducing Big Dayta to their students (ElementaryJunior High/High School are currently available and one with a heavier-statistics component for just high school coming later this summer) and a slideshow with screenshots of how to work with the data using Google Sheets for iPad.
  • Idea guide for choosing activities
  • A longer explanation of each idea suggestion along with which Common Core standards that idea is aligned with (click here for ELA ideas and here for Math ideas)
  • Big Dayta Facebook page so students and teachers can connect with each other to discuss and debate their findings.

Classrooms can use Big Dayta for one-off lessons as the school year winds down, or for longer units where students can investigate and report on the data across multiple subjects including math, writing, social studies, and more. However teachers choose to use it, Big Dayta is a chance for students to practice academic skills, critical thinking, and learn more about themselves and each other as they do it.