Teacher Seth’s Advice for Homeschooling

BGL’s Teacher Seth recently contributed to a video series curated by Learning Success on the topic of how to teach from home. Tips include creating a schedule and connecting students socially.

Check out the full video here:

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How to Create Your Child’s Flexible Learn-From-Home Schedule

Kids crave routine. They get it at school and (for most kids) it works. Adults, on the other hand, suddenly find themselves working from home with their kids as their sometimes-bubbly, sometimes-bored office mates. These parents need flexibility.

How to merge these needs into a daily schedule that works for everyone?

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Below is a strategy that worked for Seth, BGL’s founder, as he joined millions of people this week by unexpectedly doubling up on his day job to become a barely-there homeschool teacher. He followed this strategy with his first-grade daughter and it’s worked really well so far.

All of these steps should be completed with (or by) your child.

Step 1: Brainstorm all the things your child might want to do during the “school day.” We suggest listing things within categories: social calls, family contact, meals, projects, physical activity, written work, art and music, reading, math, virtual field trips, unstructured playtime, direct instruction from an adult, and, inevitably, screen time. It’s ok if some things are listed in more than one category.

Step 2: Create a bank of all your brainstormed activities. It should live in the same place you will write the schedule. Keep it organized by category. Tag activities for which they can be independent versus ones for which they might need help.

Step 3: Choose your medium. Will this be virtual schedule? Piece of paper? We suggest a white board for easy erasing with the activities bank printed out on paper and attached to the board.

Step 4: Choose your time increments. For younger kids try shorter time increments; for older kids try longer ones. Limit it to “school time” (really, your work time) – the rest of the day can be open. Let’s not get too crazy here!

Step 5: Begin to make the schedule: cross-reference your work schedule and identify times when you will be less available to support them. Drop items tagged as “independent” into those time slots.

Step 6:  Next, drop in fixed appointments such as lunch, their daily call with grandma and their (now virtual) piano lesson.

Step 6a: If you have more than one kid, drop in activities that will be done in tandem leaving the rest of the remaining time slots open.

Step 7: Finally, give them full control over the rest of the schedule. Teach them how to consult the bank of activities and drop them into the schedule at logical times. Encourage choosing at least one item from each category and adding items to the bank. Consider double blocks for activities that might require more sustained attention. Revisit the parameters often, feel free to switch things around day-of and solicit their feedback. To reduce stress, do this on the weekend for the whole week or the night before each day. Be flexible!

We hope you find this helpful! Check out our other recent blog posts aimed at supporting this brand new crop of teachers formerly known as parents.

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Working from Home? Resources for Young Children Home from School

Online teaching resources for teachers – click here.
School closures are keeping the nation’s children away from school while parents are being asked to work from home. Even the biggest critics of screen time will need to rely on some virtual babysitting just to stay afloat during this crazy time. Rather than turning on Netflix, why not edu-tain them?

 

With fun characters and catchy hooks, BGL has a library of media content for young kids. Please feel free to share these YouTube playlists:
Themes: TransportationAnimals and more!
There’s even an educational show that encourages active participation from children. With sing-alongs, read-alouds and fun activities, there’s sure to be some content on the BGL YouTube channel that will bring joy to your child’s online home-based learning.

 

By working together and sharing our resources, we can ensure that students receive the best education no matter what the classroom looks like.